Frightening facts about milk

From: http://nutritionstudies.org/12-frightening-facts-milk/

A large observational cohort study[1]in Sweden found that women consuming more than 3 glasses of milk a day had almost twice the mortality over 20 years compared to those women consuming less than one glass a day. In addition, the high milk-drinkers did not have improved bone health. In fact, they had more fractures, particularly hip fractures.

Interestingly, the study also found that fermented milk products (cheese and yogurt) significantly decreased mortality and fractures among these women. For each serving of these fermented dairy products, the rate of mortality and hip fractures was reduced by 10-15%. The researchers pin the negative effects of liquid milk on D-galactose, a breakdown product of lactose that has been shown to be pro-inflammatory. Milk has much more D-galactose than does cheese or yogurt.

I am surprised that this study garnered so much mass media attention upon its release, as it highlights the deleterious side of milk, but I also think it is important to keep the findings in context. And when it comes to the health effects of dairy, the context is not so pretty:

In observational studies both across countries and within single populations, higher dairy intake has been linked to increased risk of prostate cancer (cited in [2]).Observational cohort studies have shown higher diary intake is linked to higher ovarian cancer risk (cited in [2]).Cow’s milk protein may play a role in triggering type 1 diabetes through a process called molecular mimicry[3].Across countries, populations that consume more dairy have higher rates of multiple sclerosis[4].In interventional animal experiments and human studies, dairy protein has been shown to increase IGF-1 (Insulin-like Growth Factor-1) levels. Increased levels of IGF-1 has now been implicated in several cancers[5].In interventional animal experiments[6] and human experiments[7], dairy protein has been shown to promote increased cholesterol levels (in the human studies and animal studies) and atherosclerosis (in the animal studies).The primary milk protein (casein) promotes cancer initiated by a carcinogen in experimental animal studies[8].D-galactose has been found to be pro-inflammatory and actually is given to create animal models of aging[1].Higher milk intake is linked to acne[9].Milk intake has been implicated in constipation[10] and ear infections (cited in [2]).Milk is perhaps the most common self-reported food allergen in the world[11].Much of the world’s population cannot adequately digest milk due to lactose intolerance.

So despite being very pleased that the public is glimpsing some of the evidence against milk in this recent study (though they also could be hearing about the benefits of cheese and yogurt from this same study), I think there is a far more powerful story; a story that takes into account the largely hidden context of diet and dairy research. There is a wealth of indirect evidence of very serious possible harms of consuming dairy foods, and, on the flip side, the evidence that milk prevents fractures is scant.

As we look beyond the headlines, it is hard to think that we should continue to consume the lactation fluid that exists in nature to nourish and rapidly grow calves.

References

Michaelsson K, Wolk A, Langenskiold S, et al. Milk intake and risk of mortality and fractures in women and men: cohort studies. Bmj 2014;349:g6015. Lanou AJ. Should dairy be recommended as part of a healthy vegetarian diet? Counterpoint. The American journal of clinical nutrition 2009;89:1638S-42S. Dahl-Jorgensen K, Joner G, Hanssen KF. Relationship between cows’ milk consumption and incidence of IDDM in childhood. Diabetes Care 1991;14:1081-3. Malosse D, Perron H, Sasco A, Seigneurin JM. Correlation between milk and dairy product consumption and multiple sclerosis prevalence: a worldwide study. Neuroepidemiology 1992;11:304-12. Key TJ. Diet, insulin-like growth factor-1 and cancer risk. Proc Nutr Soc 2011:1-4. Kritchevsky D. Dietary protein, cholesterol and atherosclerosis: a review of the early history. The Journal of nutrition 1995;125:589S-93S. Gardner CD, Messina M, Kiazand A, Morris JL, Franke AA. Effect of two types of soy milk and dairy milk on plasma lipids in hypercholesterolemic adults: a randomized trial. Journal of the American College of Nutrition 2007;26:669-77. Youngman LD, Campbell TC. Inhibition of aflatoxin B1-induced gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase positive (GGT+) hepatic preneoplastic foci and tumors by low protein diets: evidence that altered GGT+ foci indicate neoplastic potential. Carcinogenesis 1992;13:1607-13. Spencer EH, Ferdowsian HR, Barnard ND. Diet and acne: a review of the evidence. Int J Dermatol 2009;48:339-47. Caffarelli C, Baldi F, Bendandi B, Calzone L, Marani M, Pasquinelli P. Cow’s milk protein allergy in children: a practical guide. Italian journal of pediatrics 2010;36:5. Rona RJ, Keil T, Summers C, et al. The prevalence of food allergy: a meta-analysis. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2007;120:638-46.

The power of essential oils

It’s not the alcohol in listerine that kills germs, the alcohol binds the essential oil in solution. I recommend this for all my patients that can tolerate it, great germ killing and I use it myself twice a day! (no I do not get paid by listerine, I just think it’s a great product with solid studies that demonstrate it’s efficacy)

HOW DOES LISTERINE® WORK?

LISTERINE® Fights Germs with Essential Oils

The power of LISTERINE® Antiseptic comes from a formula of four essential oils that kill millions of germs on contact. Our fixed combination of eucalyptol, menthol, methyl salicylate, and thymol continues to deliver unsurpassed results. No other branded mouthwash has this formula. And that’s why no other mouthwash feels or works like LISTERINE®.

LISTERINE® Penetrates Plaque Biofilm and Kills Germs

Biofilm is a more recent term for the bacterial film on your teeth we call plaque. Biofilm is an organized community of germs in a gooey matrix that enables them to multiply and survive inside your mouth. Brushing and flossing help disrupt and remove this biofilm, but sometimes may miss hard to reach areas—prime real estate for gingivitis causing germs. LISTERINE® Antiseptic rapidly penetrates the biofilm to kill plaque and gingivitis germs.

Baked Pear Crisp

Today’s recipe is brought to you from the Engine 2 Diet

Ingredients:
  • 6 pears, peeled and cored, divided
  • 2 teaspoons finely grated lemon zest
  • 1/2 cup raisins, soaked in warm water for about an hour
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract (optional)
  • 3 pitted dates, soaked in warm water for about an hour
  • 2 cups Engine 2 Plant-Strong™ Rip’s Big Bowl cereal
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
Method:

Preheat the oven to 375°F. Thinly slice 5 of the pears and place in a large bowl. Add lemon zest and toss. Chop remaining pear and place in a blender. Drain raisins, reserving the soaking liquid. Add raisins to the blender along with lemon juice and vanilla. Blend until smooth, adding a few tablespoons of the reserved soaking liquid as needed to make a purée. Pour the mixture over pears and toss gently until coated. Scrape the mixture into an 8 x 8-inch glass baking dish or small casserole dish and smooth the top.

Drain dates and place them in a food processor. Add cereal, cinnamon and salt; pulse until the mixture is finely chopped and starts to form loose clumps. Spread the mixture evenly over pears. Bake until topping is browned and crisp and filling is bubbling, 25 to 30 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Nutritional Info:
Per Serving:320 calories (40 from fat), 4.5g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0mg cholesterol,135mg sodium, 72g carbohydrate (11g dietary fiber, 29g sugar), 6g protein